Insulin Injections and Living with Diabetes

Insulin Injections and Diabetes

If you do not suffer from diabetes, chances are that your pancreas produces insulin naturally and continuously. Insulin is a hormone that is secreted to allow glucose (sugar) to enter the body’s cells for energy.

Diabete QC explains that the body produces the necessary amount of insulin based on its needs and the foods eaten. For example, after a meal or snack, the pancreas secretes an additional amount of insulin, which keeps blood glucose levels within normal limits.

When an individual suffers from diabetes, the pancreas does not produce a sufficient amount of insulin. This deficit depends on the type of diabetes the person is suffering from.

 

Type 1 diabetes

The pancreas of someone with type 1 diabetes does not produce insulin at all. People with type 1 diabetes then need to inject medically produced insulin several times a day, at varying doses. These doses are determined by their physician after extensive tests.

 

Type 2 diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes may not need insulin. Most times, type 2 diabetes can be treated with a combination of many medications.

 

What is synthetic insulin?

There are several types of Insulin for People with Diabetes.

Rapid-acting:  Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation caused by eating.  This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin.

Short-acting: Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation caused by eating.  This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin.

Intermediate-acting:  Covers the blood glucose elevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working. This type of insulin is often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and is usually taken twice a day.

Long-acting:  This type of insulin is often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin.  It lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working. It is taken once or twice a day.

 

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